Deadline

Site Maintenance: 4/1-4/2

Greetings, writers!

Our site will be undergoing scheduled maintenance starting just after midnight tonight. The site will be down on both Friday, April 1st, and Saturday, April 2nd. We expect things to be up and running again by Sunday, April 3rd.

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Our submission guidelines will still be viewable until 11:59 P.M. on this very deadline day, March 31st. Thank you for your patience!

5 Ways Music Can Boost Your Creativity

Greetings, writers!recordplaying

Remember your favorite guitar solo? How about that piano sonata that made you cry real tears? Music is an art that helps us heal and feel–just like writing. Music is poetry. Music also tells a story. Did you know that listening to music is one of the best ways to get inspired? Here are 5 ways you can use music to help you write your next poem or piece of prose.

1. Music can jog your memory. Have you ever listened to a song that reminds you of “that one time…”? Utilize that. Use that as an opportunity to explore a subject (whether that’s a person, an idea, or an object) you may have forgotten about. Perhaps listening to a song will allow you to reach new conclusions you were unable to reach before. A song can open the gates and let those words flood onto the page.

2. Music can evoke emotions. Tunes affect us more than we think. Similar to jogging memories, songs can make you feel. A heart-wrenching ballad will make you feel sad; an upbeat, bubblegum radio hit might make you feel cheerful. You can use music to influence your emotions, which in turn influences what you write.

3. Music can help alleviate your stress. Exams, jobs, relationships — so much affects us in our busy world, and the stress just keeps piling on. Listening to music can help reduce your stress levels, which will clear your mind of distractions and allow you to focus better.

4. Music can be used as a soundtrack. Sometimes, we hit roadblocks when writing our characters and settings. One way to get past this wall is to create a soundtrack for your piece (like a playlist). Picture your world like a movie scene, and think of music that might play during the movie. Focus on what the music makes you think of, what the music makes you envision. Let the music take you in new and exciting directions.

5. Music can increase your energy. When you’re more energetic, you can perform more. In the same way music affects your mood, music can perk you up or relax you.

If you’d like to learn more about the science behind music and creativity, check out this article by the National Science Foundation:

http://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/science_nation/musiccreativity.jsp

Playlist and pen ready? Take a look at our Submission Guidelines as you conduct your writing/jam session. The submissions deadline for Fall 2016 is March 31st. Happy writing!

On Campus: Publishing with Britny Cordera Doane

Old Market Poet Britny Cordera Doane: A Writer’s Workshop success story.

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The “Wingmakers” cover

This was going to be a rallying piece intended to garner support for a Kickstarter campaign, but instead it is my great pleasure to have turned this into a success story piece. Britny Cordera Doane is known as “The Old Market Poet.” She is often found typing poetry on an old analog typewriter in Omaha’s Old Market district. She is currently attending The University of Nebraska at Omaha as a religious studies and poetry major with an ancient Mediterranean studies minor. Doane’s book of poetry “Wingmakers” was recently accepted by the small but prestigious Pinyon Publishing due to release early March of 2015. She is running a Kickstarter fundraising event to get funds to buy author copies to sell locally and at author events. The book will include original illustrations by David HL Burton. With more than five days to go, Doane achieved and exceeded her fundraising goal of $1,000. The event will end February 6th, so don’t miss your chance to participate in funding this worthwhile project. Doane sat down with 13th Floor Magazine staff to discuss her experience getting her book published. Q: Describe your process for selecting publishing companies to query with your book. A: I started going around to local bookstores specifically looking for books of poetry by local authors, and I took notes of the publishing houses they were published under. Many of the publishing companies had websites so I could see if my writing, particularly for “Wingmakers,” would best fit what they were looking for. I decided to go with Pinyon Publishing because [Writer’s Workshop department chair] Lisa Sandlin introduced me to them with her amazing book “You Who Make the Sky Bend.” And I knew [Writer’s Workshop faculty] Miles Wagner also had a book published by them. When I checked out their website the type of books they were publishing were right down my alley.

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An original illustration by David HL Burton, to be included in “Wingmakers”

Q: Once accepted, what was the process like for preparing your book for publication? A: “Wingmakers” was edited a total of five times. Once or twice by me, once by my dear friend and incredible writer himself, DJ Carlile, and then a few times with Gary and Susan, the owners and head editors of Pinyon. When the full manuscript was sent to them and accepted, they made the editing process very smooth for me. They didn’t ask for many changes and all changes that were made, were approved by me ahead of time. We worked together really well; thoroughly, but also swiftly. I fell in love with the cover as soon as I saw it. Q: How did you choose kickstarter to obtain funding for your project? A: My friend, Sophia, has a non-profit strings ensemble, who did her own fundraising to make her dreams come true. She helped and inspired me to go with Kickstarter to help fund my book. I wanted to do grants, but the grant writing process took too much time, was too complicated, and there were too many grants I couldn’t apply for because of how specific they were. Plus there are so many successful publishing campaigns on Kickstarter. Q: How will you use the money you get from Kickstarter? A: I am hoping to buy 50-75 (maybe less, maybe more) copies of “Wingmakers” upfront, to sell (give as rewards to those who have donated), distribute to review journals, and different poetry awards. Then the rest I would like to pay my illustrator, go to writing conferences and workshops, and setup book readings, and signings, locally and possibly out of state. Q: What have you learned from the publishing process so far that you think other newcomers might appreciate knowing? A: When it comes to publishing, whether it be a book or individual pieces, do it often and don’t let fear of rejection get in the way of amazing opportunities. From my experience, I have learned that it is also important to really pay attention to what the editors of literary magazines or publishing companies are looking for. Actually read the books they publish and the literary magazines or reviews they come out with. Though most publishing companies and literary magazines or reviews are not genre specific, they have a good idea of what they are looking for in a poem or a piece of fiction. Lastly, if you have a manuscript ready to be sent to a publisher, send it to them over the summer. When my book was accepted in July or August of 2014, literally that same day I read an article that said to send your books to publishers over the summer. Their reasoning was that during the summer people aren’t sending in manuscripts because most people are on vacation, not writing or submitting anything. I can definitely attest to this being true as my book was accepted during the summer. Q: Where do you draw your inspiration for your writing? A: For “Wingmakers” in particular, I was inspired by a owl late at night hooting as loud as he could. A desire to write a book was brewing in me for a while, and I was always told: “write what you know.” For the longest time I really didn’t know what to write, but that night I figured it out. I wrote about what I knew and that consisted of ancient world mythologies, combined with my love for birds. I still draw my inspiration from world myths, but now a days I am working on being inspired by any and everything.

Submission Deadline is Today: Submit by Midnight!

lightbulbHappy Halloween from 13th Floor Magazine! Before you go to your friend’s costume party or take your little cousin trick-or-treating, make sure you send in your polished, professional submissions to us by midnight. As always, we’re accepting all kinds of stuff: fiction, non-fiction, painting, photography, poetry, sculpture, comics, personal essay, pottery…if it’s something you’re passionate about, have been working on for a long time, or you’re looking to gain publication experience, then don’t miss this opportunity. We’re always looking to feature new writers and artists, so don’t be shy if you’ve never submitted before. Be sure to check out our Meet the Staff page as well. Most of us are likely to be in classes with you, so if you ever have questions about the submission process or about 13th Floor Magazine in general, feel free to ask us. To refresh yourself with the submission guidelines if you’ve not yet done so, please see below.

We hope all of you have been able to create some new, original work for this next issue, and we cannot wait to begin the selection process. Thank you to everyone who has sent in your work already. We know it takes extra time to prepare something for us, but there would be no “us” without you, the UNO writers and artists.

Submission Guidelines

  • All files should be in .doc, .docx, or .rtx formats
  • Do not put your name in the document.  Do not put your name in the filename. Please use only the title of your work in the filename.  This is very important to us as we want to maintain a fair and unbiased selection process for each of our submissions.
  • In the body of your e-mail, please include a brief biography.  You can write whatever you’d like, but feel free visit our Meet the Staff page if you need some ideas.  If your submission is chosen for publication, your biography will be included in the magazine as well.  Remember, the biography needs to be in the body of your e-mail, NOT your submitted work.
  • For visual art, sent us pictures of your artwork.  If there is any special information about the art, like the medium, influences, etc., feel free to include that as well.
  • All prose and poetry should be double spaced and in standard fonts Times New Roman or Arial.  
  • Be sure to thoroughly edit your work for spelling and grammar errors so you can represent your best work possible.  If you need editing assistance, don’t hesitate to use campus services like the Writing Center.
  • If you would like more tips on professionally formatting your document, please read Formatting 101 by Marlys Pearson.

E-mail Submission

Once you have professionally prepared your submission, e-mail it to 13thfloormagazine@gmail.com Remember, include your biography in your e-mail!

If You Are an Educator

Please encourage your students to submit their best work. It’s a great way to get experience submitting professionally, and may result in publishing credits! Your help is crucial to making our campus magazine a success!

Don’t be Spooked – Submission Deadline in One Week!

submissionsHey UNO writers and artists, Halloween is only a week away!  While this means that there’s an upcoming night filled with candy, costumes, and everything pumpkin, more importantly, Halloween is the submission deadline for 13th Floor Magazine’s next issue.  That’s Friday, October 31st.   If you haven’t sent us your work yet, don’t be scared; a week is plenty of time to refine something you’d like us to showcase.  Send us your best, creative, original work of fiction, non-fiction, photography, poetry, sculpture, comics, paintings, personal essay, etc.  For those of you who haven’t submitted anything to us in the past and are apprehensive about a selection process, think of it like going into a haunted house.  You know it’s going to be frightening, and sure, there’s always a clown lurking somewhere with a chainsaw, but that’s half the fun, right?  Submitting your work for others to judge can often feel the same way; it’s nerve-wracking, but you have to get through the house and prove to yourself you can get past the clown, no matter how freaked out you might be.  We encourage all of our resident writers and artists to polish up their favorite works and get them to us soon.  Every submission we get is another treat added to our metaphorical Jack-O-Lantern basket, so keep ’em coming!

On a note of holiday spirit, here’s a link to the origin story of how Halloween came to be.  Did you know that this ancient holiday is of Celtic origin?  This short read could also get your creative juices flowing if you’re still trying to create something to submit.  To read about the interesting origin of Halloween, click here.

Submission Guidelines

  • All files should be in .doc, .docx, or .rtx formats
  • Do not put your name in the document.  Do not put your name in the filename. Please use only the title of your work in the filename.  This is very important to us as we want to maintain a fair and unbiased selection process for each of our submissions.
  • In the body of your e-mail, please include a brief biography.  You can write whatever you’d like, but feel free visit our Meet the Staff page if you need some ideas.  If your submission is chosen for publication, your biography will be included in the magazine as well.  Remember, the biography needs to be in the body of your e-mail, NOT your submitted work.
  • For visual art, sent us pictures of your artwork.  If there is any special information about the art, like the medium, influences, etc., feel free to include that as well.
  • All prose and poetry should be double spaced and in standard fonts Times New Roman or Arial.  
  • Be sure to thoroughly edit your work for spelling and grammar errors so you can represent your best work possible.  If you need editing assistance, don’t hesitate to use campus services like the Writing Center.
  • If you would like more tips on professionally formatting your document, please read Formatting 101 by Marlys Pearson.

E-mail Submission

Once you have professionally prepared your submission, e-mail it to 13thfloormagazine@gmail.com Remember, include your biography in your e-mail!

If You Are an Educator

Please encourage your students to submit their best work. It’s a great way to get experience submitting professionally, and may result in publishing credits! Your help is crucial to making our campus magazine a success!

Feedback: A New Reading Series at the Kaneko Library

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Sarah Mason: Host of Feedback Reading Series

Mark you calendars, everyone.  There are a lot of important dates coming up that you do not want to miss.  First and foremost, the next submission deadline is Friday, October 31st!  This is a busy point in the semester, so if you can send us your work sooner rather than later, that’s one less thing you need worry about. We know and appreciate that it takes extra time to prepare submissions for 13th Floor Magazine on top of your other school work, but we don’t want you to miss out on having your work published.  If you are unfamiliar with the Submission Guidelines, see below.

Secondly, and just as important,  Poet and Adjunct Professor, Sarah Mason, will be hosting a new reading series at the downtown Kaneko Library called feedback.  This reading series coupled with a follow-up workshop will be a new and exciting opportunity for experienced and up-and-coming writers in the Omaha area.  The reading event will take place on Thursday, October 16th from 7-9 p.m.  How it works: The readings will feature two writers who are seeking feedback on writing they have previously completed.  They will present their chosen works to the audience, who will, in turn, give their feedback to the reader.  Then, on Saturday, October 18th at 2 p.m., the same readers from Thursday will continue their dialogue with the audience members as they lead a workshop session to conclude the feedback process.  The featured readers/workshop leaders this month will be Jen Lambert and Stacey Waite.  Both authors are fantastic for agreeing to be part of the first feedback session, and it should be a blast getting to work with them.  If you’d like to know more about Jen, click here, and for Stacey, click here.

The goal of feedback is to spark a conversation between writers – whether they are seasoned authors or students in their first semester of the Writer’s Workshop program, it doesn’t matter.  It’s important that there is good attendance at this event in order to have substantial dialogues between the readers and the audience.  Best of all, feedback is free and open to the public! As these readings will be every three months, once per quarter, you will want to attend as many as possible to really immerse yourself in the feedback process.  Get excited, this is going to be great for the literary and art community in Omaha.  Hope to see you all there!

 

Submission Guidelines

  • All files should be in .doc, .docx, or .rtx formats
  • Do not put your name in the document.  Do not put your name in the filename. Please use only the title of your work in the filename.  This is very important to us as we want to maintain a fair and unbiased selection process for each of our submissions.
  • In the body of your e-mail, please include a brief biography.  You can write whatever you’d like, but feel free visit our Meet the Staff page if you need some ideas.  If your submission is chosen for publication, your biography will be included in the magazine as well.  Remember, the biography needs to be in the body of your e-mail, NOT your submitted work.
  • For visual art, sent us pictures of your artwork.  If there is any special information about the art, like the medium, influences, etc., feel free to include that as well.
  • All prose and poetry should be double spaced and in standard fonts Times New Roman or Arial.  
  • Be sure to thoroughly edit your work for spelling and grammar errors so you can represent your best work possible.  If you need editing assistance, don’t hesitate to use campus services like the Writing Center.
  • If you would like more tips on professionally formatting your document, please read Formatting 101 by Marlys Pearson.

E-mail Submission

Once you have professionally prepared your submission, e-mail it to 13thfloormagazine@gmail.com Remember, include your biography in your e-mail!

If You Are an Educator

Please encourage your students to submit their best work. It’s a great way to get experience submitting professionally, and may result in publishing credits! Your help is crucial to making our campus magazine a success!

Sue William Silverman and Submission Deadline!

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Author Sue William Silverman

Hope everyone is still having a great semester.  It’s crazy to think that it’s already about half way over.  Which means that our next submission deadline is approaching at the end of this month, on October 31st.  Make sure to send us your work of fiction, non-fiction, poetry, photography, sculpture, personal essay…whatever creative written or visual art you do!  If you’ve got it, we want it.  See the submission guidelines below.

The third installment of the Writer’s Workshop Reading Series takes place this evening, Wednesday, October 8th, in the Dodge Room of the Milo Bail Student Center at 7:00.  Tonight’s reader will be Sue William Silverman, author of Because I Remember Terror, Father, I Remember YouLove Sick (which has been made into a movie featuring actress Sally Pressman), and her latest memoir, The Pat Boone Fan Club: My Life as an White Anglo-Saxton Jew.  Sue is a victim of sexual abuse and sex addiction.  While the topic of some of her writing is quite serious, she is very talented at crafting her pieces to be full of wonderful language and strongly written prose.  This event will be a memorable one, so make sure you head to the University of Nebraska-Omaha this evening.  As always, these events are open to the public and are free for everyone, so bring a friend!  Hope to see you all there!

 

Submission Guidelines

  • All files should be in .doc, .docx, or .rtx formats
  • Do not put your name in the document.  Do not put your name in the filename. Please use only the title of your work in the filename.  This is very important to us as we want to maintain a fair and unbiased selection process for each of our submissions.
  • In the body of your e-mail, please include a brief biography.  You can write whatever you’d like, but feel free visit our Meet the Staff page if you need some ideas.  If your submission is chosen for publication, your biography will be included in the magazine as well.  Remember, the biography needs to be in the body of your e-mail, NOT your submitted work.
  • For visual art, sent us pictures of your artwork.  If there is any special information about the art, like the medium, influences, etc., feel free to include that as well.
  • All prose and poetry should be double spaced and in standard fonts Times New Roman or Arial.  
  • Be sure to thoroughly edit your work for spelling and grammar errors so you can represent your best work possible.  If you need editing assistance, don’t hesitate to use campus services like the Writing Center.
  • If you would like more tips on professionally formatting your document, please read Formatting 101 by Marlys Pearson.

E-mail Submission

Once you have professionally prepared your submission, e-mail it to 13thfloormagazine@gmail.com Remember, include your biography in your e-mail!

If You Are an Educator

Please encourage your students to submit their best work. It’s a great way to get experience submitting professionally, and may result in publishing credits! Your help is crucial to making our campus magazine a success!