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Positive Psychology

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By: Moises Delgado

As we continue to settle into this new semester, let’s take a moment to talk about positive psychology. Typically, when we think psychology, we think symptoms, we think negatives, we think what has me down? And that is alright. Please do make time to think about what is troubling you, and to think about what can be done to battle those issues. But I also want to point out that we often give the negatives too much importance, we give them too much strength over us. So, I want to propose that we try and infuse more positivity into our daily lives.

First, what is positive psychology? To sum it up, it’s a movement to change the usual focus in psychology from the negative to the positive. To celebrate and improve strengths, dreams, and happiness. To build resilience. It’s inevitable: the semester will be more stressful as we continue. We’ll feel down, we’ll ponder purpose, we’ll lose sight of our goals. We’ll ignore the good and allow the bad to weigh us down. Therefore, here are some exercises that can be used to reign in positivity:

 

  1. Daily Achievements

At the end of the day, grab a notebook, a scrap piece of paper, or your phone, and jot down a few of the day’s successes. Any success, minor or major. For example, eating breakfast would be something that would go on my list. I, more often than not, skip breakfast and wait until late in the afternoon to have a single bite of food. Perhaps this will motivate me to change my eating habits. The point of this list is to make you feel good about yourself. To feel proud no matter how big or small the achievement.

And alternative is to make a checklist the night before. Reinforce your day’s successes by getting satisfaction from crossing off things off that list!

 

  1. Goals / Dreams / Aspirations 

Take a moment to remember why you’re in school, and/or why you’re working a certain job, and/or why you’ve joined a certain club, whatever it may be. Stop and use a few minutes to list in your mind (or on a sheet of paper) what your goals are. Most important, after you have your list, make another list and title it: “What I’m Doing to Achieve My Dreams.”

It’s easy to think about what we are not doing and why we may not be able to accomplish our goals, but that is not the purpose of this. Consider instead what you are doing now to reach your dream(s). Throw in what you’ve done already to be a step closer. Mix in your strengths, your connections, your experiences and think about how they will help and have helped you get closer to your goal(s).

 

  1. What Makes You Happy? 

Consider what makes you happy. Spending time with family, hanging out with friends, folding origami, writing, playing video games, reading manga, observing the moon. Make a list. What makes you happy? The purpose of positive psychology is to promote mental health, to build resilience through happiness, to focus on the strengths of an individual. So, after you have your list, go and do the things that make you happy! I understand life can be busy, but find, or make, some time to focus on you and your mental health.

It won’t always be easy to look at the positive side. I am a pessimist who often sees an empty cup no matter how much water is in there. But too much negativity is debilitating. At the end of the day, remember that your mental health is as important as your physical health. It can be easy to ignore, but tend to it as you would tend to a physical bruise. If need be, seek out help; you’re not alone.

 

Here is a link for UNO’s counseling services: https://www.unomaha.edu/student-life/wellness/counseling-center/services.php

Make Writing Your New Year’s Resolution

By: Breany L. Pfeifer

Happy New Year!

Ringing in the new year is a great way to start 2018 off on the right foot. With that being said, what are your goals for 2018? More specifically, what are your writing goals for this fresh new year?

As writers, it is important to set valuable and realistic goals for yourself. You may often have peers, mentors, instructors, or other writers tell you to “write every day,” and they are right. What better way is there to improve your writing besides practice?

I get it; it’s not easy to feel inspired to write every day, and it may be difficult to find the time. However, writing is a great way to relieve everyday stress, and is an amazing way to vent or escape reality. Consider making writing each day your new year’s resolution.
Here are five things to help you keep writing—whether it’s journaling, writing poetry, making short stories, or writing a full novel:

1. Set a daily word count. Whether its 500 words or 2000 words. Give yourself a challenge, but keep it realistic. If you know you don’t have time to write 1,600 words per day, set your goal to 700, and don’t stop writing until you reach that number.

2. Make a specific writing time, and find a comfy place. Perhaps you have free time at 6:00 p.m. every day. Spend that time writing non-stop, until you feel ready to be done. Also, find a spot to write. Whether it’s in your living room, kitchen, the coffee shop down the street, or your roof (be safe up there), find an inspiriting location you love, and make it your writing space.

3. Don’t push yourself too hard, but stay persistent. As previously stated, make sure your goals are realistic, but challenging. If you find writing 500 words per day too easy, bump up to 700 or 1,000. Challenge yourself to write in a genre outside of what you usually write. For example, if you normally write fiction, try a day of poetry. You could even spend a day revising some of your previous work. Whatever you do, don’t stop writing!

4. Determine what plotting method works for you. This doesn’t only apply to only story or essay writers. Poets can choose a “topic” to write about. This is when you must ask yourself: “Do I prefer to create outlines and plot out my work? Or, do I want to put the pen on paper and let my hand and mind soar freely?” Knowing which method you use may help you create your best work.

5. Surround yourself with other writers. You don’t have to know New York Times Bestselling authors to find yourself some writing buddies. Look for a local workshop group, or a writer’s group on Facebook to make some new friends. Find a workshop pen-pal to share your work with and discuss ideas. If you’re a student, join a writing club. If you already know some other writers, take the initiative and invite them to have coffee one day and talk about writing. Getting involved in a writing community will inspire you to do more with your creations.

On Summer Writing Workshops

By: Sophie Clark

In the summer of 2017, I was willing to try anything. During the semester prior, I had become distant to my writing and decided to devote my free time in the summer to attending poetry workshops and traveling. First, I planned to attend the Juniper Summer Writing Institute at UMass Amherst for a week in June. Then, in July, I signed up for a weekend workshop at the University of Iowa in Iowa City for the Iowa Summer Writing Festival. I anticipated a summer of inspiration and dreamed of meeting and learning from well-known writers as well as finding the path to becoming one myself.

At UMass Amherst, I was placed in a poetry workshop with Timothy Donnelly (Author of The Cloud Corporation). For a week, I would attend a craft talk in the morning, a workshop in the afternoon, and enjoy a reading by a contemporary writer in the evening. I found the writers involved in the program to be wonderful and the attending students encouraging. However, while I was there, I noticed I had done very little writing. Although I attempted to write in my free time, I felt too intimidated to write amongst the attending writers and decided to settle for taking a lot of notes instead. At the end of the week, I was glad to have gained a lot of books and information but was ultimately disappointed that I didn’t write more.

After my experience at Juniper, I had not given up hope on my Iowa Summer Writing workshop experience. I planned to do nothing but write for an entire weekend. Although I ended up writing a bit more because my group was writing from prompts in our workshop, I still wasn’t writing from that great source of inspiration I had hoped to find there. Again, I settled for mostly taking notes and exploring the city.

At the end of the summer, I was left with a good amount of books and a good amount of advice written in my notebook. In the coming semester, I would learn my inspiration was just around the corner and that I would soon find my voice in writing once again. Since that summer, I’ve not only learned that you cannot force inspiration but also that you cannot simply expect it. I was waiting for something to happen to me while, in truth, I had to make it happen myself. While I would recommend attending these workshops if you have the time and money, I would also advise you to truly make it worth your resources. Work hard while you’re there and try to get into good writing habits you can stick with afterward. And if you are unable to attend these workshops (which many of us college students are), know that if you work hard, you can gain the same knowledge on your own. Your greatest inspiration is waiting for you, but you ultimately have to find it for yourself.

Save the Date for the 700 Words Prose Slam!

Have you ever wanted to read your work before an audience? UNO’s Writer’s Workshop and English Department will be holding a prose slam at Apollon Art Space on Thursday, April 6, 2017. Come out at 7:00 to read your work. Or, if you don’t have anything to read, stop by and support the readers for free!

Omaha Artist Series: Kristopher Rosa

Art is a powerful thing. It is a way to tell stories without words and interpretation is always welcome. It takes time to create, much like change.

Kristopher Rosa invites this type of thinking into his work. From a very young age Rosa developed an interest in animals while trying to develop his artistic style, “When I was about five  years old living in California, my cousin Cole and I would always draw sharks and sea creatures. He got me into art. In 2009, I decided to go to college for art and graphic design, I took figure drawing and painting classes for two semesters. That kind of got me in the groove.”

Rosa has transformed both of these passions into a platform to create a message of preservation.

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“In recent years I’ve been hearing about animal abuse. Animals near extinction, global warming, everything that is effecting the bees, frogs, everything! My personal belief is that animals aren’t just animals. They are creatures of the same earth.”

Using both images of strength, majesty, and mindfulness Rosa hopes to become involved with organizations that can donate and raise awareness for broader audiences.

To see more of Kristopher Rosa’s work  you can find him on Instagram and his website.

Don’t forget to check out our Rosa favorites in our gallery!

 

Omaha Artist Series: Christopher Couse

Quirky, thoughtful, and always reminding Omaha to stay “good-weird”, Pennsylvanian transplant, Christopher Couse is always on the artistic move.

You can find some of his current work at the Bemis Benefit Art Auction, but he’s also been a part of the Tiny Mural Project, and just finished up an exhibition at Petshop gallery featuring iconic chairs in the pop culture realm.

Much of Couse’s work acts as commentary, often playing off advertisements and weaving together elements of collage, illustration, and photography along with comedic angst to tell a narrative.14716281_1601499023479450_6273992219171266209_n

“A lot of my style comes from drawing inspiration from collagists, early pop-art works, street art, and growing up with a lot of great cartoons in the 90’s. But I also get really energized and inspired by looking at lot of contemporary peers, local and international.”

To see more of Couse’s projects, and keep track of his current and upcoming exhibitions and events you can find him on his websiteInstagram, and  Facebook.

To see some of 13th Floor’s favorite Couse works, see here!